Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th International conference on Fisheries & Aquaculture Toronto, Canada.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Fisheries 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kenneth Cain photo
Biography:

Kenneth Cain does his research which primarily focuses on the fish immune system and developing new and improved aquaculture vaccines and other alternative disease management tools/products. This work has provided a greater understanding of the role mucosal immunity and antibody play in mucosal vaccines for fish. Efforts in his laboratory have led to the development of a live attenuated vaccine against Coldwater disease and rainbow trout fry syndrome for use in salmonid aquaculture. This vaccine is under commercial development. Furthermore, his lab has discovered a naturally occurring putative probiotic in the microbiota of rainbow trout capable of reducing mortality when applied to commercial feeds and fed to rainbow trout. These new disease management tools have the potential to provide significant production improvements for aquaculture.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A new nickel with the global population expected to reach 9 billion by the year 2050, aquaculture will continue to expand and provide the majority of seafood products to meet world demand. Current and future expansion must be done in a sustainable and economically viable way. As new aquaculture ventures develop, disease management is often neglected due to a lack of appropriate tools/products to combat new and emerging diseases. There is a strong need for new and better products, but the challenges facing successful development and commercialization of vaccines or other disease control products are immense. Bacterial diseases are the most common problems in marine and freshwater aquaculture and in some cases vaccines are successfully used to prevent or control mortality. However, many operations rely on antibiotics to control diseases. To remain a viable and sustainable industry, alternatives to antibiotics must be further developed. Better vaccines aimed at preventing or limiting disease outbreaks are important, but other alternatives (e.g. functional feeds, probiotics, etc.) are being explored. Two such tools/products will be highlighted and discussed. Our group has developed and patented a live attenuated immersion vaccine that protects fish from bacterial Coldwater disease/rainbow trout fry syndrome (CWD/RTFS). This vaccine has been proven efficacious in fish as small as 0.5 g  and all aspects of this vaccine are currently being optimized for commercialization. Another potential alternative tool to control this disease involves a putative probiotic (Enterobacter C6-6), which was recently discovered and shown to reduce mortality when fed to fish infected with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of CWD/RTFS. Interestingly, the mechanism associated with this bacteria’s ability to inhibit F. psychrophilum in vitro and reduce mortality in rainbow trout in vivo appears to be linked to an antimicrobial peptide. The development, subsequent optimization, and potential path to commercialization of these fish health tools/products will be discussed.

Break: Refreshment Break 10:50-11:10

Keynote Forum

Ernesto A Chavez

Interdisciplinary Center for Marine Sciences, Mexico

Keynote: The future of fisheries and fisheries science

Time : 11:10-11:40

OMICS International Fisheries 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ernesto A Chavez photo
Biography:

Ernesto A Chavez did his PhD in 1978. He is the Professor of the Marine Sciences Research Centre of the Polytechnic Institute in La Paz, Mexico. His research interests are Bio economic assessment of fisheries by simulation, impact of climate on fisheries, coral reef ecology. He is the teacher of the courses, fisheries simulation, fisheries management and coral reef ecology at the graduate program of his research centre. He has been adviser of 25 MSc thesis B Sc, 16 at the MSc Program and 5 at Ph D level. He has led 17 research projects and has collaborated on another 16. He has published more than 150 scientific papers, including the co-edition of a book on the coral reefs of the south Gulf of Mexico (2007), translated into Spanish (2010).

Abstract:

Within all the problems that society faces, in the context of a population boom and a growing environmental pollution, the future of the fisheries is burdened by the political trends and the ruling economic and social factors. The development of fisheries is in the midst of the need to feed a growing human population and the consequences of the depletion of exploited stocks, motivated by economic interests and constrained by their finite biomass. Economic factors, social factors and the dynamics of fisheries face each other, multiple interacting problems, but they have their own dynamics and complicate the possibility of finding isolated and independent solutions. Aquaculture seems to offer a light of hope for mankind by helping to solve the problem of producing food from the aquatic environment. However, this is not a permanent solution. There are certain trends in fishery development which in practice, may contribute to a future that can help fisheries to become truly sustainable, such as reduction of discharges, gradual reduction of the production of large vessels, improvement of management measures, increased involvement participation of the, eco-labeling of fishery products, reduction of illegal fishing, relative price stability and certification of many fisheries, among others. All these factors open a window of hope that allows us to expect that the sustainability of fishing can become a reality, rather than a utopia. In this, meeting we will be presenting papers with different orientation and I am confident that as a whole, all the participants will contribute to achieve that desired goal.

  • Aquaculture | Aquatic Organisms | Aquatic Animal Health & Medicine | Coastal & Marine Aquaculture | Aquatic Toxicology | Aquaculture Engineering
Speaker

Chair

Kenneth Cain

University of Idaho, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ernesto A Chavez

Interdisciplinary Center for Marine Sciences

Speaker
Biography:

Sixto E. Portilla began his graduate studies in 1996 in water resources; earning a Master of Science degree in Environmental Engineering from Manhattan College. He began studying estuarine ecology in 2007, and shortly afterwards, in 2008, began his doctoral work at the City University of New York. A series of his recent publications articulate the role of two dietary omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, abundant yet variable in our local phytoplankton, in facilitating successful acclimation of the filter feeding bivalve, Mercenaria mercenaria, to decreasing temperature. In 2015 he began investigating the environmental factors preceding historic fishkills of Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, some claiming 100s of thousands of fish per event, through the lens of cell membrane homeoviscous adaptation. His presentation today describes the development of a theory linking diet and decreasing atmospheric temperature to these massive menhaden fishkills.

Abstract:

Temperature change affects remodelling of cell membrane phospholipids in poikilothermic organisms to maintain constant cell membrane viscosity. Rapidly decreasing temperature demands rapid remodelling, and often forces poikilotherms to promptly acclimatize to a lower thermal regime. Recently published research provide evidence suggesting that dietary omega-3 fatty acid content may have a profound impact on the ability of filter-feeding Atlantic menhaden to acclimatize to a rapidly cooling environment. Temperature profiles and micro-plankton records preceding several major 2015 menhaden fishkills in the northeast United States provide additional evidence that particular omega-3 dietary fatty acids found in micro-plankton may control acclimatization to decreasing temperature in this species.

Biography:

Muruganandam Muthiah is Fulbright Visiting Scientist at Department of Natural Resource Management, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA. He is a founder Scientist of Fisheries/Aquatic Science Department at ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation (ICAR-IISWC), Dehradun. At IISWC, he is Faculty Member and In-Charge of Fisheries Science. He has over 25 years’ experience on Watershed-Based Fisheries/Aquaculture Research and Training. He has completed/handling 17 research/demonstration projects and published over 100 research/technical papers including five books, two manuals, six technology brochures and two theses. He organized two national conferences besides much training/camps/field demonstrations to diverse stakeholders. He is an active member in over 16 professional societies. He is recipient of over 12 professional recognitions including three National Fellowships and Fulbright award. He was resource person in about 70 national/international training/extension programs. He has attended over 75 national/international Conferences/Symposia and many technical Workshops/Meetings and co-chaired few technical sessions. He also visited Auburn University, Alabama, USA as a visiting researcher.

Abstract:

India being an agrarian country with over 70% people depending on agriculture for food/livelihoods, agriculture/allied sub-sectors get much importance. India with huge aquatic resources has registered a phenomenal growth in fisheries production with 10.8 million tons (mt) in 2015-16 (6.4% of world’s total fish) from mere 0.75 mt in 1950-51, which is 14-fold increase. Being one of the top fish producers and 2nd in aquaculture production in world, India earns about US$ 5 billion (2015-16) through exports (10% of total export and 20% of Agriculture export). Also, fisheries support 15 million people for food/livelihoods and contributes 1.1% to total India’s GDP (5.3% to Agriculture GDP). Presently, freshwater fisheries is growing faster as compared to marine fisheries. About 3.58mt (2015-16, 33% of total) against estimated potential, 4.41mt marine fish produced and rest (67%) came from freshwater. Of late, aquaculture contribution outweighed capture fisheries. Despite growth, India presently produces 10 times lower than China (leading fish producer) and stands around 136th-rank in per capita fish consumption with 9kg amongst 160 countries of world. India invests more on research and technological advancements to improve fish production and meet projected demand, 15mt fish by 2020 with 8% annual growth rate. Asian carps including Indian (Catla catla, Labeo rohita, Cirrhinus mrigala) and Chinese carps (Cyprinus carpio, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) besides catfish (Pangasius pangasius) and cichlid (Tilapia sp.) in warm water and trout (Salmo trutto fario, Oncorhynchus mykiss), mahseer (Tor putitora), and Indian trout (Schizothorax richardsonii) in coldwater; shrimps (Penaeus monodon, P. indicus and P. vannamei), seabass (Lates calcarifer) in coasts and cobia (Rachycentron canadum), pompano (Trachinotus mookalee) and groupers (Epinephelus sp.) in marine environments are some of the species that are currently cultivated/promoted. Effective utilization of unutilized/under-utilized resources through modern farming systems, mobilizing farmers/stakeholders, technological innovations and policy/support mechanisms are some of ongoing thrusts.

Break: Lunch Break 13:15-14:05
Speaker
Biography:

Portia Chiyedza Chifamba has keen interest in Fish and Fisheries Biology. Her work includes studies of diet and growth of several fish species. She has undertaken extensive studies of two fish species introduced into Lake Kariba; Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus and freshwater sardine, Limnothrissa miodon. The studies demonstrate that unplanned introduction of Nile tilapia had negative impact on the ecosystem compared to planned introduction of the sardine intended to fill a vacant niche and improve fish production. She has compared the diet, aggression, reproductive capacity and growth of the Nile tilapia in order to determine the traits that might have given the introduced species competitive advantage over the endemic indigenous cichlid, Oreochromis mortimeri. The fisheries work she has undertaken includes establishing that effective fishing effort in the sardine fishery and it increases as a result of fishing vessel and gear improvement, an aspect critical in the management of fishing effort.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A fishery on an introduced freshwater sardine, Limnothrissa miodon started in Lake Kariba in 1974. Fishing effort and catches increased to peak in 1990 and thereafter declined. Overfishing and climate change are blamed for the collapse of the fishery. Fishing is known worldwide to drive evolution of life history parameters and should be monitored. There has been no attempt to examine both alleged causes of collapse together and no recent estimates of size at maturity.
Aim: The purposes of this study were to establish the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY), to evaluate the relationship between fishing effort, environmental variables, fish catches and effort and also determine size at maturity.
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The catch and effort time series data were used to fit two surplus yield models from which the MSY and the effort used to catch it was calculated. The association of fishing effort and Catch per Unit Effort (CPUE) with temperature and hydrological variables were assessed using Generalized Linear model analysis. Size at maturity, when 50% of fish in particular length or age group are mature, was estimated using logistic curves.
Findings: The fishing effort after 1990 was above MSY, suggesting overfishing. The CPUE is significantly correlated to air temperature. A multiple regression analysis showed that fishing effort and lake level explained the variation in total catch whilst fishing effort and maximum temperature explained variation in CPUE (as indicator of biomass), suggesting a strong effect of fishing effort. Maturity occurred at a much smaller size in this study than before the fishery.
Conclusion & Significance: A combination of unsustainable fishing effort and unfavorable environment may have contributed to the collapse of the fishery. Environmental condition particularly climate change and small size at maturity may affect the recovery of the fishery even when fishing effort is reduced.

Speaker
Biography:

Vasu Jayaprakas is currently working as a professor at Amity University Uttar Pradesh, India. He is a scientist with a wide range of experience in Fisheries, Aquaculture and Marine Science. An aquaculture expert with vast experience and knowledge in commercial farming of marine shrimps, brackish water and fresh water fishes. He is associated with academic agencies, policy makers, Government bodies and NGOs to carry out aquaculture projects in coastal areas. He is the In-charge of Integrated Research Project on Fish-cum Livestock culture, pig-cum fish culture and composite culture of carp and giant fresh water prawn.

Abstract:

In the present study, 19 species of free-living protozoans have been identified and characterized from the Vembanadu Lake. A total of 15 testacid rhizopods belonging to two orders, six families and nine genera and theciliates of three orders, three families were recorded. Among the testaceousrhizopods one species from Arcellidae family, five from Centropyxidae, one species from Nebelidae, six from Difflugidae belonging to the Class Lobosea and two species from the Class Filosea belonging to Cyphoderiidae and Euglyphidae families were identified. Some of these free living forms have given certain insights into the prevailing ecological conditions of the ecosystem thus acting as perfect bio-indicators. Euglypha tuberculata, reported in the present study is a species of wide tolerance and survives in diverse habitats. Similarly Cryptodifflugia oviformis which was reported for the first time in India, in this study, prefers dryer environments. Due to its smallsize, this species mainly feeds on bacteria and yeasts; their high abundance explains active decomposition process in the area. The diversity of the free-living ciliates in the study area included species belonging to three genera namely Euplotes, Tachysoma and Coleps and they were pollution indicators possessing the property of heavy metal uptake. The water quality analysis and heavy metal analysis proved that the waters are polluted with heavy metal concentrations and these dominant ciliate species can be used as good bio-indicators, reflecting the natural ecological conditions prevailing in the water body and for bioremediation of aquatic pollutants in aquaculture systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Madlen Mikhael Habashy is the Professor of Invertebrate Aquaculture at the Fish Research Station El Qanater El-Khayria, Invertebrate laboratory (N I O F). She is the member of Egyptian Society for the Development of Fisheries Resources & Human Health. Her current research focuses on Aquatic Invertebrates, aquaculture and fisheries.

Abstract:

A 12-week randomized factorial design 3×4×2 (three feeding levels, four feeding frequency and two replicates) rearing trial was conducted in glass aquariums with an average initial weight of 0.014±0.01 g/ pL25 and an average initial length of 1.10±0.12 cm of each freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, to examine the effects of the three feeding levels and four feeding frequencies on growth performances, survival rate % feed utilization and body composition. Twenty four aquariums, 120 l each were stocked with 30 juvenile each. The aquariums were divided randomly to give three feeding levels of 3, 5 and 10% of body weight daily and four feeding frequencies (once/day at 9.00 h. Twice/day at 9.00 and 20.00 h. Thrice/day at 9.00, 15.00 and 21.00h. Four times/day at 9.00, 13.00, 17.00 and 21.00 h) involving two replicates each. The results revealed that, mean final weight (g/animal), mean final length (cm/animal), gain in weight (g/animal), gain in weight %, gain in length, gain in length %, SGR (% per day) and survival rate % were significantly increased with increasing feeding level and exhibited the highest values at the 5% feeding level. While, feed conversion ratio, feed efficiency ratio, protein efficiency ratio and feed intake (g/animal) were significantly (P≤0.01) the best at the 3% feeding level. Feeding frequency were significantly affected by the mean final weight (g/animal), mean final length (cm/animal), gain in weight (g/animal), gain in weight %, gain in length, gain in length %, SGR (% per day), survival rate %, feed conversation ratio, feed efficiency ratio, protein efficiency ratio and feed intake (g/animal), its values were increased with increasing feeding frequencies and had the best values at the feeding frequency of three times daily. Condition factor (K) was significantly affected with feeding levels and feeding frequencies with highest values at feeding frequency of three times daily and feeding levels of 10% body weight daily. Whole body composition % of moisture decreased (73.29%) at 3% feeding levels and was not significantly influenced by feeding frequencies. Protein and fat contents of the whole body were significantly (P≤0.05) influenced by feeding levels but protein content did not get influenced by feeding frequencies. The highest protein content and lowest fat content were obtained at 5% feeding levels. Crude ash content of the whole body composition was significantly affected with feeding frequencies but not influenced by feeding levels. There was a significant (P≤0.01) interaction between feeding levels and feeding frequencies in all parameters studied. From the above results, it can be concluded that, feeding levels of 5% body weight daily at feeding frequencies of 3 times daily for freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, juveniles exhibited the highest growth performance, survival rate % and the best feed utilization parameters which would seem to be the most desirable feeding levels and frequencies under this experimental conditions.

Biography:

Muruganandam Muthiah is Fulbright Visiting Scientist at Department of Natural Resource Management, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA. He is a founder Scientist of Fisheries/Aquatic Science Department at ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation (ICAR-IISWC), Dehradun. At IISWC, he is Faculty Member and In-Charge of Fisheries Science. He has over 25 years’ experience on Watershed-Based Fisheries/Aquaculture Research and Training. He has completed/handling 17 research/demonstration projects and published over 100 research/technical papers including five books, two manuals, six technology brochures and two theses. He organized two national conferences besides much training/camps/field demonstrations to diverse stakeholders. He is an active member in over 16 professional societies. He is recipient of over 12 professional recognitions including three National Fellowships and Fulbright award. He was resource person in about 70 national/international training/extension programs. He has attended over 75 national/international Conferences/Symposia and many technical Workshops/Meetings and co chaired few technical sessions. He also visited Auburn University, Alabama, USA as a visiting researcher.

Abstract:

Prevalence of ignorance and misconceptions amongst the ethnic communities brings extension related problems that affect adoption of improved technologies significantly in northwestern Himalayan region of India. Often, effective extension approaches are as essential as the development of technologies per se since ineffective extension of technologies would cause poor adoption of even the time-tested technologies. At this context, a survey was conducted to test the hypothesis that extension problems constraint and remedying them would improve fish farming. Fifty general farmers each from both foothill and mid-hill Himalayas totaling 100 drawn randomly covering various qualification and age status surveyed during 2005-15. In addition, 30 farmers and trainees of ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation (ICAR-IISWC), Dehradun were interviewed. The problems-cause diagrams on lack of fish farming/integrated fish farming were drawn with help of villagers, field observations, expert opinion and limited farm surveys/experimentation and they included various socio-economic, socio-cultural, biophysical, technological and extension issues. We have identified high ranking misconceptions including negative apprehensions of farmers and ground-level constraints for fish farming, prevailing interfaces between water conservation and fisheries development attributes. Most farmers, up to 80% had over 15 mythical ideas about fish farming. Also, unscientific and faulty fish farming practices, such as stocking more fish seedlings, excessive water exchange or flow-through, application of no/little lime and fertilizers to maintain water quality and no surveillance for disease monitoring and control through regular netting and prophylactic/preventive measures were observed in all of the few existing fish farms. Lack of capital, critical inputs, proper ownership of ponds/water resources and knowledge were high-ranking problems in most cases (over 70%). Scientific and logical explanation on realities of over 15 superficial subscriptions and needed policy, extension approaches, institutional arrangements and support provisions are discussed. The scenarios observed/recommendations made here hold good for most part of India and other countries.

Speaker
Biography:

A. K. Bhargava has an expertise of more than 35 years in Marine Fisheries survey in the Indian EEZ. He had served as a Zonal Director in Fishery Survey of India, a subordinate office of the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India. He is a recognized guide in Mumbai University and had guided students to a Ph.D. degree in Marine Fisheries especially in stock assessment, fish biology, and biodiversity. He is instrumental in scientific research especially in Taxonomy, Stock Assessment, and Fishery Oceanography and has a strong administration and fine teaching experience. He had coordinated many International and National research and development oriented projects. He had enormous research publications in peer-reviewed Journals and author of many books published by Fishery Survey of India.

Abstract:

A tropical country like India is blessed with highly diverse marine fishery resources in its 2.02 million square kilometer Exclusive Economic Zone, with an annual harvestable potential of about 4.4 million metric tonnes. The coastline of peninsular India runs over 9 states and 2 Union Territories (UT) and is bound by the Arabian Sea in the west and Bay of Bengal in the east. The western coastal states are Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka and Kerala and the eastern coastal states are Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Odisha and West Bengal. The UTs which have sea-line running along their borders are Daman & Diu and Puducherry. The Andaman & Nicobar Islands are separated from the peninsular Indiaand contributes significantly to the marine fisheries. The Indian marine fisheries sector provides livelihood to nearly 4.0 million people and contributes to export earnings of the country to the tune of 30,000/- crores annually. In the year 2016, it has been estimated the marine fish landings for peninsular India as 3.63 million tonnes which has witnessed an increase of 6.6% compared to 2015. West coast contributed a major share of 64% to the total landings. The northwest region has the maximum quantity with 11.8 lakh tonnes of landings (33%). The south-west region follows the northwest with 11.1 lakh tonnes (31%). The south-east region and north-east region contributed 9.4 lakh tonnes (26%) and 4.0 lakh tonnes (10%) respectively. In marine fish production, Gujarat remained as the major producer followed by Tamil Nadu and Karnataka. Pelagic resources contributed 52% to the total landings of the country with major share of Indian mackerel, oil sardine and ribbonfish. Demersal finfish constitute 29% in which threadfin breams, croakers and Priacanthus spp. were found as the major groups. The share of crustacean landings was assessed at 12% of the total landings and that of molluscan resources at only 7% where squids and cuttlefishes got the maximum share. Indian mackerel have been placed in the top spot of the major resources obtained from Indian waters in 2016 with an estimate of 2.5 lakh tonnes. For the first time since 1999, oil sardine was not ranked the top species in terms of catch as it fell below Indian mackerel. Since 2013, oil sardine landings continued to show a decreasing trend, with an estimate of 2.45 lakh tonnes in 2016. The anchovies landing in the year 2016 is estimated to be 1.42 lakh tonnes.

Break: Refreshment Break 16:10-16:30
Speaker
Biography:

Zakir Hossain is working as an Associate Professor from January 2016 to present in the Department of Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh where he is continuing his research on lipids. From July 2012 to December 2015 has worked as a Research Associate in the Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba under the supervision of Professor Dr James K Friel. There also he worked on dietary lipids metabolism to the preterm infants. From 2009 to 2012 he has worked as an Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries Biology and Genetics, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. He has supervised 14 Master’s students who did their research on lipids (2009-present).

Abstract:

In the present study sperm quality, histological structure of the liver and developmental stages of ovary, level of Ca2+ concentration, embryonic development and larval growth were investigated for the confirmation of the positive effects of PUFAs in reproduction and gonadal maturation of gangetic leaffish, Nandus nandus and gourami, Colisa fasciatus. Treated group was fed 1% squid extracted phospholipid supplemented diet whereas controlled group was fed with the same, except phospholipid. In comparison to the control group, treated group exhibited higher gonadal maturation which resulted in spontaneous spawning. The live sperm count was significantly higher (P<0.01) in treated group compared to control group. During the peak breeding (April) season in case of treated group most of the oocytes were found at nuclear migration and tertiary yolk oocyte stage while in case of control group most of them were found in primary and secondary yolk oocyte stage. During spawning season lipid granules and normal morphological structures of hepatocytes with enlarged nucleus and considerable amount of vacuoles were observed in case of phospholipid treated fish liver whereas less lipid granules with scattered necrosis and large vacuoles in cytoplasm with polarized nucleus were observed in control group. The serum Ca2+ concentration in treated females were significantly higher (P<0.05) in contrast to the controlled females of both the fishes during the breeding season. The experiment suggests that supplementation of dietary PUFAs eventually improve the spawning performances of fish.

Shahid Amjad

Institute of Business Management (IoBM), Pakistan

Title: Impact of climate variability on Pakistan’s coastal fishery

Time : 16:55-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Shahid Amjad has a PhD from School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, UK. His MS is from the University of Oslo Norway in Benthic Ecology. He has completed courses in Management of R&D Institutes from University of New South Wales, Australia. He has been associated with the National Institute of Oceanography as Director General and with various top universities of Pakistan as Acting Vice Chancellor and Professor. He has also been associated as a visiting faculty with NED and the University of Karachi since 2005.

Abstract:

The North Arabian Sea offers products and services essential for the development of Pakistan’s coastal economy. The productive fishery potential of developing coastal states bordering the Arabian Sea would be impacted by climate variability. Marine ecosystems are likely to become less productive as a result of the changes to the ocean chemistry, water quality, coastal mangroves and fisheries. Marine ecosystems will become more vulnerable to other environmental impacts due to changes in climate variability. Vector Auto Regression (VAR) model has been used to forecast impacts of climate variability (temperature, precipitation and freshwater availability) on coastal fisheries. The fish production forecast is dependent on variables temperature and rainfall. The VAR model forecast fisheries production for possible climate change scenarios. The VAR model anticipates that if temperature decreases by 2oC and rainfall increases by 10% it would have a positive impact on the fish production (661.19 m tons) an increase of 35.2% of the existing fish production. However, if temperature alone increase by 50C, a decline of 34% fishery has been predicted by the model. Climate variability threatens to disrupt the marine eco-region by disrupting the physical features and ecosystem functions that support biota. The economic wealth of Pakistan’s coastal zone is derived from living and nonliving resources and products of direct market value (e.g., fish and fishery products, coastal dependent activities, maritime trade, port and shipping activities, beach recreation and tourism etc.), which earn millions of US dollars in foreign exchange. Fishery resources are renewable and even increase with sustainable management and conservation practices. The increased fragility and sensitivity of the coastal marine ecosystem needs to be taken into consideration holistically during the development of climate change policies.

Atul K. Singh

Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research, India

Title: Scientific approaches towards rainbow trout farming in Indian uplands for entrepreneurship development

Time : 17:20-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Atul K Singh is the director of ICAR-Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research, Bhimtal, Uttarakhand. His international experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. His research interests as a Scientist reflect in his/her wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

The mountainous regions in the Himalayan states of India is endowed with copious amounts of highly oxygenated pristine freshwater highly suitable for culturing rainbow trout, which is a robust and fast growing salmonid fish farmed across the globe. Eventually after its introduction in India in the early 20th century, rainbow trout is fast becoming the most remunerative cold water fish that provides livelihood and food security to the hill population. The present annual rainbow trout production in India is nearly 842 tons from 62 government trout farms and 660 private trout production units distributed across the states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. Serial and parallel flow through raceway culture systems is widely used. In terms of seed and feed production capacity, there are 32 government affiliated rainbow trout hatcheries with an estimated production capacity of 13 million eyed ova and 3 well equipped feed mills with an installed capacity of nearly 10 tons per day. Considering the huge gap between the actual and potential trout production, the ICAR-Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research is undertaking concerted research and development efforts to expand and intensify rainbow trout production, in partnership with the concerned state fisheries departments. Spatial decision support system has been employed to generate GIS based site suitability maps for trout culture. To minimize land and water usage in trout culture, water recirculation system has been developed on trial basis. Laying the base for genetic improvement programs, genetic variability in different rainbow trout stocks has been characterized using DNA marker technologies. Moreover, rainbow trout brood banking and triploid production trials have been initiated. Comprehensive disease surveillance is continually undertaken and diagnostic/control methods are being developed. Cost-effective feeds with better feed conversion ratio have been developed and the use of sustainable feed ingredients is being evaluated. Farm operation and activities like fish seed transportation are being scientifically optimized. The concept of cluster farming modules and culture chains are also gradually introduced and promoted by sharing technical knowledge and science base culture technology that facilitate high returns on investment. All these multipronged strategies will stimulate vertical and horizontal expansion of trout production in India.